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to address what needs to be done in that environment. none of that is done without our dependence and involvement in the cyber war. technology drives everything we do. the internet has made is more connected than at any other time. the vast majority of our infrastructure reside in private sector. let me repeat that. the vast majority of our infrastructure reside in the private sector. the national security risks and the economic risks are still with the private sector. the government does not do it alone. they do it in concert with our partners and our partners are the private sector. for those of you were talking to earlier, with the work for the government or the private sector, you can contribute no matter where you are in whatever your professional desire is. this private-sector holds a lot of data and these are pretty profound -- their protection of the priorities is he has a list of priorities. this is the top five. the cyber threat is among the most serious challenges we face as a nation, and america's prosperity will depend on cyber security. the united states does have a
were changing to get out of the environment and see how the war was being reported and get back in and get the story. i was traveling around with different officers. most of my time was spent traveling with general petraeus. to security areas and sitting in meetings with him in kabul. if there was not a lot of concern. that is the story reported over the year. we then fit in the biographical digressions. and what i tried to show and i pulled my dissertation were the variables that were influencing david petraeus' thinking. his social networks and his mentors. there are four mentors. holly has been a wonderful source of information. the second is keith running deal. he was -- nightingale. he helped to start the joint special operations trinity concentrate he had been involved in the hostage rescue. their letters show how he was thinking about special operations and that community which not all of people know he has that background and interest in. albeit a sort of academic interest. the third key mentor and most influential is general jack galvin. he was assigned with gen. galvin
a group like this. but there is support for it in this environment and so i don't think, the system will dissolve just because there's resistance. >> trevor, i often feel like when you talk to political operatives on both sides and found risers on both sides, and donors, you hear from a strong word but this is kind of self hating core to the people are participating in this system that feel trapped. this thing is just going to go on and, therefore, they'll play and get used to. is that what is sustained this? what is it that keeps it going? >> during the course of the campaign i a chance to talk to a range of major republican donors comment and even victimized even they because i think republicans were interested in the super pacs, the party had embraced of them and citizens united. but i found romney donors saying to me this is terrible. i don't want to be able to write an unlimited check. this is not our president ought to get selected. we need to talk about this after the election. so, you know, now think one of the things that i will be doing is circling back around and saying,
, as does my environment just by nature. so the book is very much about our landscape, how we perceive it as fascinating in our youth and how over time it changes. the same substance -- stone, rock, water, wood -- go from being the unknown, worthy of curiosity, to at some point being a threat. and the natural defiance of us living our lives, which is in defiance of our mortality all the way from childhood where we're immortal to our elder years where we become the thing that holds so many people we've lost and is what survives. memory is what survives. and within that memory the afterlife of so much. so thank you. [applause] >> good afternoon. i'd also like to thank the organizers of the miami book fair for having me. when i started writing my book a year or two ago, i certainly did not expect i would end up here or seated on a panel with these gentlemen. i think what we've heard so far is that a lot of war stories represent a need to explain. why was there an outpost where there should never have been an outpost? what's the context within my own war experience? who was i before i went
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4